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Governor Rick Perry Defends Labrador Retriever, Shoots Coyote While Running.

Governor Perry, endorsed by the National Rifle Association and Texas State Rifle Association, is no stranger to firearms. He has his CHL (Concealed Handgun License) and often visits firing ranges to hone his skills.

As Governor, Rick Perry signed the "castle doctrine," a bill that gives Texans a stronger legal right to defend themselves in their homes, cars and workplaces.

Governor Perry's record on protecting the Second Amendment stands in stark contrast to his opponent's.

Fox News reported on Governor Perry's now-famous encounter with a coyote out on the running trail:

AUSTIN, Texas -- Texas Gov. Rick Perry has a message for wily coyotes out there: Don't mess with my dog.

Perry says he needed just one shot from his laser-sighted pistol to take down a coyote that was menacing his dog during an early morning jog in an undeveloped area near Austin.

Perry told The Associated Press he sometimes carries his pistol, loaded with hollow-pointed bullets, when he jogs on trails because he's scared of snakes -- and that he'd seen coyotes in that area.

When the coyote came out of the brush toward his daughter's labrador retriever puppy on a February jog, he charged it and shot it with his .380 Ruger pistol.

"Don't attack my dog or you might get shot ... if you're a coyote," Perry said.

Read the entire article here.

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Cap and Tax Threatening Texas Jobs

In less than six months, Texas voters will go to the polls and choose between two starkly different visions for Texas.

The first vision is one of limited government that fosters an environment for good Texas jobs, economic growth, boundless opportunity, and greater personal freedom.

The second, favored by Gov. Perry’s opponent, is a vision of more government spending, more taxation, and expanded government control over every aspect of your life. He supports the goals Obama-care. He calls spending cuts by state agencies “Soviet-style” governance. And he supports California-style emissions regulations, which would cripple industry in Texas.

In fact, if you wonder why Bill White is an Obama-like liberal, look no further than the issue of cap and trade…more accurately known as cap and tax, because it will cap our economy and tax away our jobs.

While Texas leaders fight the Obama Administration’s job-killing regulatory policies in court, the former mayor of Houston—our nation’s largest energy producer—advocates policies that would decimate the very industry the Bayou City was built on.

The Democratic nominee for governor went so far as to send an advisory memo to Obama’s chief of staff, telling him how to sell cap and tax to the American public!

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Ladies and Gentlemen, Start Your Engines!

NASCAR Race Day: Perry & Labonte #71

Perry & Labonte NASCAR #71

Perry & Labonte NASCAR #71

NASCAR Race Day: Perry & Labonte #71

NASCAR Race Day: Perry & Labonte #71

NASCAR Race Day: Perry & Labonte #71

View photos from all the NASCAR events Governor Perry attended by visiting his flickr page!

Also, you can continue to show your support for Governor Perry by becoming a fan on Facebook and following @GovernorPerry on Twitter.

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Race Day

Texas' own NASCAR chamption, Bobby Labonte, will be driving the #71 Governor Perry 2010 car at Texas Motor Speedway today.

Team Labonte Perry

Start Your Engines

Labonte

Preparation

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#71 Moving Texas Forward Tour Schedule

Governor Perry's 2010 campaign is sponsoring NASCAR Champion Bobby Labonte's car at Texas Motor Speedway on Sunday, April 18, 2010. Bobby Labonte, #71, will be driving the Governor Perry 2010 car at Texas Motor Speedway, which adds $300,000,000 to the region's economy every year. In anticipation of this exciting event, the Rick Perry #71 car will be touring the Great State of Texas this week, and it's coming to a stop near you!

Come on out, bring your family, friends, coworkers and neighbors to get your picture taken with the #71 car! Everyone is invited.

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Texas Plays Cards Right In Dealing With Stimulus

February 20, 2010
Tyler Morning Telegraph
A recent Associated Press headline makes it abundantly clear why Texas was right to turn down federal "Race to the Top" funding last month. The story was titled, "Schools face big budget holes as stimulus runs out." "The nation's public schools are falling under severe financial stress as states slash education spending and drain federal stimulus money that staved off deep classroom cuts and widespread job losses," the AP reported. "School districts have already suffered big budget cuts since the recession began two years ago, but experts say the cash crunch will get a lot worse as states run out of stimulus dollars." The result, the AP added, could be "more teacher layoffs, larger class sizes, smaller paychecks, fewer electives and extracurricular activities, and decimated summer school programs." States that relied heavily upon stimulus dollars -- and less on planning ahead and making economies -- will be hit the hardest. "The situation is particularly ugly in California, where school districts are preparing for mass layoffs and swelling class sizes as the state grapples with another massive budget shortfall," AP reported. That's one reason Texas was wise to turn down further federal "incentive" money -- a federal bailout, with no fiscal reform, only puts off the inevitable. Gov. Rick Perry had other reasons, as well. "Texas won't compete for up to $700 million in federal stimulus money for education because the program 'smacks of a federal takeover of our public schools,' Perry said," the AP reported last month. "The funding is from the U.S. Department of Education's 'Race to the Top' program, a $5 billion competitive fund that will award grants to states to improve education quality and results. The program, created in the economic stimulus law, is part of Democratic President Barack Obama's efforts to overhaul the nation's schools." As Brooke Dollens Terry of the Texas Public Policy Foundation points out, the "Race to the Top" money would have been very costly, indeed. "In order for a state to apply for its share of President Obama's Race to the Top stimulus funds, it will have to explain how it will use those federal dollars on a list of suggested education reforms," she explains. For one thing, education is a state matter -- not a federal responsibility. "Texas lawmakers control funding and school requirements, and the State Board makes decisions about curriculum," she says. "All of these are elected positions directly accountable to the voters at least once every four years." And the federal funds would have to be "leveraged" by the state -- meaning we would have to spend money to get money. It could be as much as $3 billion (in revamping curriculums to meet federal mandates) to have access to a maximum of $750 million. But the stark reality is stimulus money isn't limitless -- it will dry up. Other states are already facing that reality. By prolonging the pain, Washington isn't doing those states any favors. Texas was right to turn down the funding. That's the lesson here.

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Texas exported $163 billion in goods in 2009

February 11, 2010
San Antonio Business Journal
Gov. Rick Perry said Thursday that Texas has been ranked the country’s No. 1 exporting state in the United States for the eighth consecutive year. He credited the state’s economic environment — including its low taxes, a favorable regulatory climate and a skilled and educated workforce — for holding that distinction. “Texas leads the nation in so many positive categories, from Fortune 500 companies to job creation, and we owe it to our citizens to continue our economic success by adhering to our proven fiscal disciplines,” Perry says. “Our principled leadership has created an environment that allows us to compete for jobs, investment and business, and defend the economic climate that has made Texas the top exporting state in the nation for the eighth straight year.” Texas’ exports totaled more than $163 billion for 2009, with the top export recipients being Mexico, Canada, China, the Netherlands and Korea. These countries imported $56 billion, $13.7 billion, $8.9 billion, $6 billion and $5.3 billion in Texas-manufactured goods, respectively. Texas’ top exporting industries in 2009 were computers and electronics, chemicals, machinery, petroleum and coal, and transportation equipment. He also credited the Texas Enterprise Fund for helping to attract businesses, jobs and investment to the state. The fund was instrumental in convincing Allstate Insurance Co. to establish a bilingual call center in San Antonio and create up to 600 jobs. San Antonio and six metropolitan areas in Texas are expected to be among the first to emerge from the recession, according to Moody’s Economy.

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Texas adds 50,000 jobs in fourth quarter

February 8, 2010
Dallas Business Journal
Texas added 50,000 new jobs in the fourth quarter and activity in the new housing sector remains strong in both Dallas and Houston, according to a new study by SigmaBleyzer. The Lone Star State has one of the lowest unemployment rates in the nation. The positive quarterly job numbers come despite the state losing 24,000 jobs in the construction, trade, transportation and hospitality sectors in December. According to a recent Texas Workforce Commission report, Texas experienced employment increases in education, health care, mining and logging. The study also focused on the broader economy of Texas, which remains under a downturn, but holds a positive outlook for the coming year. Among residential housing, some signs of recovery are beginning to emerge, according to the report. Texas has one of the fastest population growth rates in the country, which the report says should sustain long-term demand for housing. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, about 27 percent of all new privately-owned housing units in the nation’s 20 largest cities were located in Dallas or Houston. The state’s export activity continues to recover as high oil prices and improving foreign demand for high-tech manufacturing increase. Texas remains the largest exporter for the eighth consecutive year. In the first 11 months of 2009, Texas exports only fell by 18 percent, compared to the 21 percent decline nationally. “This resilience of Texas exporters should help keep the state’s economy on more sustainable footing as the U.S. economic recovery becomes increasingly dependent on the strength of foreign demand,” the report by the Houston-based private equity firm stated.

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Rejecting Race to the Top funds was an easy call

February 4, 2010
Austin American Statesman
Rick Perry
Based upon the reaction out of Washington, I must have touched a nerve when I announced that Texas won't be pursuing the strings-attached federal stimulus funds known as Race to the Top (RTTT). President Barack Obama and his administration have put a target on the backs of Texas leaders, taxpayers and employers because state leaders and lawmakers have proven that conservative principles can balance budgets, improve schools, clean the environment and help entrepreneurs create jobs. Texans have also led the 10th Amendment charge to protect state sovereignty from threats like Obama's latest effort to circumvent the right of states to determine how to best educate their children. The problem with RTTT funding is clear: Under the program's rules, Washington gives preference and dollars to states that agree to adopt national standards that haven't even been written yet. Texans strongly support the high standards and strong accountability for our schools that have made us a national leader in both categories. Other states are even studying our approach, the first in the nation to make a college-preparatory curriculum the default for every student, as a basis for their own standards. Texas is home to some of the country's most innovative charter schools, with more than 115,000 students on nearly 500 campuses. It has the largest merit pay program for outstanding public school teachers. I've also recently announced efforts to make it easier for students to learn via the Internet and called on legislators to bulk up our instruction in critical areas like science, technology, engineering and math. I suspect there is some head-scratching going on in our nation's capital as federal officials try to figure out how our test scores are rising and our dropout rate falling without mandates or bribes from Washington. Put simply, we have poured our efforts into preparing the state's students for the jobs of tomorrow. Considering Texas is among the nation's leaders in standards, I imagine whatever federal standards are eventually agreed upon will be weaker than the ones we have now. Adding injury to insult, the price tag to change all our text books and instructional materials to comply with Washington's vision for public education would be about $3 billion. In return, Texas could expect to get back from Race To The Top as little as $75 a student, barely enough to fund our state's educational system for two days. So turning down the strings-attached stimulus money was an easy call — in terms of ensuring our children get the best education possible and in simple matters of dollars and cents. A few days after I made that announcement, the president said he wanted another $1.35 billion in borrowed dollars to expand RTTT so he could sidestep states and appeal directly to individual school districts that might be willing to sign away their authority in return for a quick infusion of some federal cash. Why are Obama and his allies so insistent on funding only those who will accept federal strings and standards? Why not just fund good programs, like we do in Texas? An answer might be found in a speech Secretary of Education Arne Duncan delivered early last year. Duncan said, "If we accomplish one thing in the coming years, it should be to eliminate the extreme variation in standards across America." Let's set aside the argument that the "variation in standards" among states fosters innovation and a healthy competition that drives standards ever higher all over the country. That's not what this seems to be about. This seems to be about one thing, and one thing only: federal control. Washington doesn't have an issue with our programs. Washington doesn't have an issue with our academic or accountability standards. It just wants to make sure it calls the shots, not Texas educators, school boards and other elected officials. Should Washington drop its focus on the adoption of national standards and simply allow states the freedom to use this money to fund quality programs on a one-time basis, we can consider possibly applying for future grants. Until then, however, the education of our children is far too important to entrust to some federal bureaucrat toiling in a distant federal building. In Texas, we are fighting to maintain our freedom to hold our children to high standards, because that's the only way Texas will maintain its established reputation as a national leader in job creation, innovation and quality of life.

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Perry Touts Tax Cuts, Balanced State Budget

Friday, January 29, 2010
News-Journal.com
Christina Lane
On the eve of the second Texas Republican gubernatorial debate, Gov. Rick Perry told East Texans that under his administration, Texas has set a blueprint to recover from the economic crisis that he believes Washington should follow.

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Using Debt To Pay The Bills? Not Anymore In Houston

May 13, 2010
<i>Missing Taxes Day 67: While liberal trial lawyer Bill White runs from his record, Houston Mayor Annise Parker tells the truth to Houston City Council</i> For 67 days, liberal trial lawyer Bill White has ignored calls for transparency and refused to release his income taxes for his years in public service. He also ignores reality when he claims that he balanced budgets while mayor of Houston. During a meeting of the Houston City Council yesterday, Houston Mayor Annise Parker continued her efforts to clean up the fiscal mess that White created during his six years of deficit spending. In unveiling her proposed FY2011 budget, Parker said, “It is also the first budget in the last five years that has not used pension obligation bonds to balance it. I have long been uncomfortable with the idea of using debt for current obligations. And you will see that our debt payments are down as a result of that.” [1] “Liberal Bill White has zero fiscal discipline,” said Texans for Rick Perry spokesman Mark Miner. “While mayor of Houston, Bill White borrowed hundreds of millions of dollars so he could claim that his budgets were balanced, and now Houston has more debt per capita than California. He is hiding this fact just like he is hiding his tax returns for his years in public service.” During the six years White was Houston’s mayor, expenses exceeded revenues every year and $245 million in proceeds from pension obligation bonds were diverted to the city’s general fund to balance the budget. White’s borrowing left Houston with more debt per capita than California. [2] Governor Rick Perry warned against this sort of diversion when he allowed Senate Bill No. 1696 to become law without his signature on June 20, 2003. Senate Bill No. 1696 allows cities with populations of more than 100,000 to issue pension obligation bonds to pay for unfunded liabilities in municipal retirement funds. “As long as they are used correctly, these bonds are a proven tool for addressing short-term funding concerns. I am concerned, however, that some cities may not use this tool properly or effectively,” Gov. Perry wrote. [3]

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Houston Mayor Ends Liberal Trial Lawyer Bill White’s Enron-Style Accounting

May 12, 2010
<i>Missing Taxes Day 66: White used $245 million in borrowed money to balance his budgets</i> On day 66 of liberal trial lawyer <a href="http://www.liberalbill.com/" target="_blank">Bill White</a> hiding his taxes from the people of Texas, residents of Houston finally have a budget that is balanced without using borrowed money. In releasing her proposed FY2011 budget, Houston Mayor Annise Parker said, “For the first time in a number of years, the budget also does not include the use of Pension Obligation Bonds.” [1] Parker’s fiscally responsible approach is a stark contrast to White’s six years of deficit spending, where expenses exceeded revenues every year he was mayor and White’s borrowing left Houston with more debt per capita than California. [2] White claims to have balanced Houston’s budgets, but he omits the fact that he diverted $245 million in proceeds from pension obligation bonds to the city’s general fund to do so. [3] <a href="http://www.rickperry.org/">Governor Rick Perry</a> warned against this sort of diversion when he allowed Senate Bill No. 1696 to become law without his signature on June 20, 2003. Senate Bill No. 1696 allows cities with populations of more than 100,000 to issue pension obligation bonds to pay for unfunded liabilities in municipal retirement funds. “As long as they are used correctly, these bonds are a proven tool for addressing short-term funding concerns. I am concerned, however, that some cities may not use this tool properly or effectively,” Gov. Perry wrote. [4] “The budget that Houston Mayor Annise Parker has proposed ends the Enron-style accounting that liberal Bill White used to balance Houston’s budgets while he was mayor,” said Texans for Rick Perry spokesman Mark Miner. “Bill White continues to hide from the fact that he mismanaged Houston and his successor is cleaning up the fiscal mess he created. When will Bill White stop running from his record and come clean by releasing his taxes for his years in public service?”

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VIDEO: Texans For Rick Perry Releases New Video, “Bill White’s Houston Metro-gate”

May 12, 2010
With continued reports of scandals at Houston Metro caused by former Houston Mayor Bill White’s hand-picked leadership, Texans for Rick Perry has released a new video, “Bill White’s Houston Metro-gate.” This video is available online at www.rickperry.org and www.youtube.com/user/liberalbillwhite.

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VIDEO: Texans For Rick Perry Releases New Video, “Bill White’s Houston Metro-gate”

May 12, 2010
With continued reports of scandals at Houston Metro caused by former Houston Mayor Bill White’s hand-picked leadership, Texans for Rick Perry has released a new video, “Bill White’s Houston Metro-gate.” This video is available online here and http://www.youtube.com/user/liberalbillwhite: <center><object width="560" height="340"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/yeUl3FJC1tg&hl=en_US&fs=1&rel=0"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/yeUl3FJC1tg&hl=en_US&fs=1&rel=0" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="560" height="340"></embed></object></center>

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Bill White: For Enterprise Fund Before He Was Against It

May 11, 2010
<i>Supported Same Job Creation Model as TEF for Houston</i> While Bill White criticizes the effective job creation efforts made possible by the Texas Enterprise Fund (TEF), which has created more than 50,000 jobs for Texans and generated more than $14 billion in capital investment, he fails to mention his past praise and efforts to emulate the same job creation model in Houston. In 2004, Bill White held a press conference where he accepted several recommendations from his self-appointed Economic Development Task Force, one that included creating a city enterprise fund modeled after the TEF. According the Houston Chronicle, “The mayor said he would follow the task force report's recommendation of developing a multimillion-dollar enterprise fund to help biotechnology firms pay for their research with the aim of creating new jobs. Lee Hogan, chairman of the task force, said Houston receives about $1 billion a year in federal grants for biotechnology research, mostly at the Texas Medical Center. But he said the city has done a poor job of translating this research into spinoff companies and new jobs. Hogan said the enterprise fund would be modeled after a $250 million state enterprise fund, developed by Gov. Rick Perry, which runs out of money in October 2005.” (SOURCE: “Reliance on tax breaks faulted – Report says city should use other methods to draw business,” Houston Chronicle, 9/30/2004)

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