Petition: Secure the Border

If you are like Gov. Rick Perry, and you agree the federal government must take responsibility and secure our border, sign this petition.

Gov. Perry visits Iraq, eats by flashlight, is awakened by embassy alarm

July 19, 2009
Ft. Worth Star Telegram
Chris Vaughn
Gov. Rick Perry, on his second trip to Iraq this year, ate dinner with National Guard troops by flashlight Saturday night after a generator quit, prompting him to joke that it turned into a "very romantic setting."On Sunday morning, he was abruptly awakened at 5:30 by the U.S. Embassy’s alarm for incoming rockets, perhaps an ordinary event in Iraq but one rarely heard in Austin. "I knew when I woke up, that is not my alarm clock," Perry said during a brief phone interview from Baghdad on Sunday. "We have no idea what that was about. There was no damage to the embassy. But it was a fairly exciting start to the day." Perry, a former Air Force pilot, landed in Iraq on Saturday with four other governors: Tim Pawlenty of Minnesota, Jay Nixon of Missouri, Jim Gibbons of Nevada and Pat Quinn of Illinois, all invited by the Defense Department. He visited in Iraq in January and thought there were a "multitude of reasons" for going back. "No. 1, to tell these young men and women that the people in Texas are supporting them, praying for them and that they are ready for them to come home," he said. "It’s worth my time to tell them, 'Thank you, we’re proud of you, and God bless you.’ "

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Governor Perry's interview with Bill Whittle of PJTV.

Sunday, Governor Perry connected via satellite from Kuwait with PJTV's Bill Whittle. The two discussed the Governor's recent visit with Texas soldiers in Iraq, progress in and hope for the new democracy, and a few other issues.

You can watch the entire interview here:

Governor Perry on PJTV via satellite from Kuwait

The Governor also shared some photos via twitter over the weekend, so be sure to follow @GovernorPerry on Twitter.com to get updates straight from Governor Rick Perry. If you are on Facebook, be sure to become a supporter here: http://Facebook.com/GovernorPerry.

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Good News.

While some in Washington are spending an inordinate amount of time these days running down Texas for perceived political gain, Governor Perry is proud that Texas remains the nation's economic leader.

Texans are clearly responding to Governor Perry's optimistic message about Texas; today's Rasmussen Reports poll, showing the Governor leading by 10-points, confirms that voters prefer Perry's brand of strong conservative leadership to mere harping from the sidelines.

If you have not had the opportunity to hear Governor personally deliver his message about Texas leadership, please take a few minutes to watch one of the many speeches available on the campaign YouTube channel.

These days, however, it's not just Governor Perry advocating the Texas model; our state's success story is beginning to get out, far and wide.

National Review, calling Governor Perry a "classic conservative hard case," published a must-read article this month about our Great State:

Governor Perry sums up the Texas model in five words: "Don't spend all the money." Here's what a good long run of small-government, low-tax conservatism has achieved in Texas: Once a largely agricultural state, Texas today is home to 6 of the 25 largest cities in the country, more than any other state. Texas has a trillion-dollar economy that would make it the 15th-largest national economy in the world if it were, as some of its more spirited partisans sometimes idly suggest it should be, an independent country. By one estimate, 70 percent of the new jobs that were created in the United States in 2008 were created in Texas. Texas is home to America's highest-volume port, the largest medical center in the world, and the headquarters of more Fortune 500 companies than any other state, having surpassed New York in 2008. While the Rust Belt mourns the loss of manufacturing jobs, Texans are building Bell helicopters and Lockheed Martin airplanes, Dell computers and TI semiconductors.

You may have also seen The Economist's coverage of the ongoing battle between Texas and California for preeminence in the United States-- Texas has the upper hand in that rivalry.

And let's not forget Forbes, which declared this week, "In Texas, you can get ahead in the recession" and wrote that "it's not surprising that two Lone Star state cities come out on top" of its latest rankings.

That Texas cities would come out on top is not surprising to the writers of Forbes, because the word is getting out: Texas is the model for America's economic recovery.

Help Governor Perry's campaign keep the good news flowing. Sign up for your own personal fundraising page at http://RickPerry.org/fundraise, and be sure to become a supporter on the Governor's Facebook page.

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VIDEO: Governor Perry speaking to the McLennan County Republican Women in Waco.

Last night in Waco, Governor Perry earned rave reviews for his passionate, inspirational speech to the McLennan County Republican Women at their Lincoln Day dinner.

Watch the speech for yourself in the three clips below.

Part 1:

Part 2:

Part 3:

The Governor also tweeted a few photos live from the event on his Twitter feed: @GovernorPerry. For the latest videos, updated almost daily, check back often at Governor Perry's YouTube channel.

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Going Alamo: Why jobs and companies are flocking to a big small-government state

July 20, 2009
National Review
KEVIN D. WILLIAMSON
If you want to know where the future is headed, look where the people are going. And if you want to know where the people are going, check with U-Haul. Here's an interesting indicator, first noted by the legendary economist Arthur Laffer: Renting a 26-foot U-Haul truck to go from Austin to San Francisco this July would cost you about $900. Renting the same truck to go from San Francisco to Austin? About $3,000. In the great balance of supply and demand, California has a large supply of people who are demanding to move to Texas. There's a reason for this. "Did the greater prosperity in low-tax states happen by chance?" asks Laffer, who studied the issue for a detailed economic report, Rich States, Poor States. "What seems obvious to us appears as right-wing science fiction to many California legislators and pundits. They claim that serious reform of the tax code is unrealistic, that a large state has many duties to fulfill, and that it is irresponsible to call for a return to a 19th century view of the role of government. . . . Not only does Texas lack a highly progressive income tax — it doesn't have one at all! We hasten to add that the last time we checked, Texas still had literate kids, navigable roads and functioning hospitals, which one would think impossible given the hysterical rhetoric coming from defenders of California's punitive tax system. In fact, the Texas success story illustrates everything we have been recommending for California all these years. How do they do that?" How, indeed? Texas was among the last states to enter the recession. California is expected to be the last state to leave it. Texas has lots of jobs and not much in the way of taxes. California, the other way around. California has Arnold Schwarzenegger, a Hollywood Republican who presided over enormous expansions of spending and debt. Texas has <a href="/about">Rick Perry</a>, a classic conservative hard case who just vetoed a pre-kindergarten spending bill, adding to the record number of vetoes he's handed down as governor. And it's not just Perry — the story of Texas politics is full of Democrats who would have been too right-wing to be elected as Republicans in Connecticut or Pennsylvania. Things are a little different down south of the Red River. Governor Perry sums up the Texas model in five words: "Don't spend all the money." Here's what a good long run of small-government, low-tax conservatism has achieved in Texas: Once a largely agricultural state, Texas today is home to 6 of the 25 largest cities in the country, more than any other state. Texas has a trillion-dollar economy that would make it the 15th-largest national economy in the world if it were, as some of its more spirited partisans sometimes idly suggest it should be, an independent country. By one estimate, 70 percent of the new jobs that were created in the United States in 2008 were created in Texas. Texas is home to America's highest-volume port, the largest medical center in the world, and the headquarters of more Fortune 500 companies than any other state, having surpassed New York in 2008. While the Rust Belt mourns the loss of manufacturing jobs, Texans are building Bell helicopters and Lockheed Martin airplanes, Dell computers and TI semiconductors. Always keeping an eye on California, Texans have started bottling wine and making movies. And there's still an automobile industry in America, but it's not headquartered in Detroit: A couple thousand Texans are employed building Toyotas, and none of them is a UAW member.

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